Bearing Fabulous Witness

So this is pretty cool … Kimberly Kidwell and Katie Short got married on the front lawn of the Equality House on Saturday, about 50 feet from the grounds of the ever popular Westboro Baptist Church, home of the largest selection of closeted and self-loathing homosexuals this side of the Mississippi.

Or the most brilliant gang of Poes to have ever lived.  History will decide.

The Westboro members, who are infamous for staging anti-Gay protests at the funerals of fallen soldiers, were forced to watch as Kimberly Kidwell and Katie Short said “I do” just 50 feet from their front doors in Topeka, Kan.

Hey, down in front. (Photo from Colin MacMillan via YouTube)

Aaron Jackson, one of the founders of the Equality House’s Planting Peace charity, described the entire event as “absolutely perfect” thanks entirely through the community’s generous donations.

As for the WBC members, the often obscenely vocal arch nemeses of all things homosexual, they made their presence known with signs bearing vile messages and upside-down American flags, Jackson said. But otherwise they kept their distance and didn’t get involved.

They did hop onto Twitter and gave their usual spiel of “mluh mluh, fag gay homo, et cetera, preachable moments, mluh mluh …” but people weren’t really listening.  Complicating things somewhat is the fact that same sex marriage isn’t legal in Kansas … as you might have already guessed with it being Kansas and all.  So, while the ceremony was a beautiful expression of love between two people who want to spend the rest of their lives with each other, it does absolutely nothing in the eyes of the state.  Even so, they did it in order to bring attention to the fight for marriage equality and the upcoming decision by the Supreme Court on the Defense of Marriage Act.

“We wanted to play a part in bringing two people together that are very much in love, and it’s an unfortunate fact that the government treats them as second-class citizens,” Jackson said of the Equality House’s decision to host the wedding and get involved in the marriage equality fight.

As he explained, they give “a good reputation of the gay community, they’ve been together for five and a half years, and they’ve been waiting for their state or the higher courts to vote to overturn the anti-gay discrimination law.”

The Supreme Court’s decision is due in the next week or so.  If DOMA is ruled unconstitutional, then it will eliminate the restriction on federal marriage benefits, and force states to recognize same sex marriage performed in other states [EDIT: … only when there’s a court case involved, it seems.  Still, I guess it’s something?].  Living in the Pacific time zone, I’ll be the last of just about everyone to hear about it, and take even longer to write something in response to it.  That’s okay … it’ll be worth it.  In the meantime, congratulations to Kim and Katie.  I hope you can do it for real sometime soon.

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8 Responses to Bearing Fabulous Witness

  1. Dan Adler says:

    “home of the largest selection of closeted and self-loathing homosexuals ”

    I dunno why people insist on saying this. It can’t be wishful thinking from the gay side (we do NOT want them). Haters hate. They don’t need to be closeted or self-loathing to do so.

    I really am surprised that the WBC folks stayed indoors (after hanging banners and planting signs). This was their perfect opportunity to come out and do what they do so well: Yell stupidity. And they passed up on it. And it’s not like they didn’t have plenty of advance warning, time during which they could have been rallying their forces. It’s strange.

    “If DOMA is ruled unconstitutional, then it will eliminate the restriction on federal marriage benefits, and force states to recognize same sex marriage performed in other states.”

    Nope. It won’t have any effect on states where same-sex marriage still isn’t legal. It will force the federal government to recognize, as legitimate, those marriages, but will almost certainly not have any effect on states. I wish it were otherwise, but not so much.

    As for Kim & Katie, I am amused by them getting married in Kansas, where it’s not legal. Of course, they’re from Arkansas, where it’s also not legal. So this was all just symbolic anyway. But still, congrats to them (cuz all a wedding is, is just symbols anyway).

    • I dunno why people insist on saying this. It can’t be wishful thinking from the gay side (we do NOT want them). Haters hate. They don’t need to be closeted or self-loathing to do so.

      I know, and I admit I might be a little heavy handed when it comes to this, but I see it as a matter of degree. For a run of the mill church or religious group to come along and bash homosexuality these days, I generally see it as them throwing red meat to their members and doing hat they think is “popular”. They may not even care about the issue and the harm such a perspective causes to others, but are just treating the entire topic as a way to get business in communities they know will respond well to that kind of garbage.

      The Phelpses, on the other hand … for right or wrong, I keep thinking there’s something more. Their collective obsession with this one singular issue and the degree to which they’ll lose their minds over it at any given opportunity makes me believe that some in that family identify with what they hate so much. It’s not without precedent. You’ll see politicians every day yapping about “family values” and “traditional marriage” only to be seen schtupping their secretary at the local Motel 6 when they think the cameras aren’t watching. Then there’s people like Paul Cameron who, like Fred, spent his life condemning homosexuality, only to come out later not only as homosexual himself, but as the victim of child sexual abuse.

      So it’s true … haters will hate. It might be ignorance and fear talking, and that’s it … but they’re a really special kind of crazy.

      It won’t have any effect on states where same-sex marriage still isn’t legal. It will force the federal government to recognize, as legitimate, those marriages, but will almost certainly not have any effect on states. I wish it were otherwise, but not so much.

      I’ve always been shaky on some of the details. States won’t be forced to legalize SSM, and you’re right – they won’t even have to recognize anything from other states if they don’t feel like it … but they will, as far as I know, have to acknowledge the validity of out of state marriages if there’s a court ruling or anything involving federal benefits. I really wish some of the articles I read about this stuff were more clear. I’ll make a quick edit to try to make it a little more accurate.

      • Dan Adler says:

        “It’s not without precedent. You’ll see politicians every day yapping about “family values” and “traditional marriage” only to be seen schtupping their secretary at the local Motel 6 when they think the cameras aren’t watching. Then there’s people like Paul Cameron who, like Fred, spent his life condemning homosexuality, only to come out later not only as homosexual himself, but as the victim of child sexual abuse.”

        This is true. But painting the entire organization (or any entire organization) as “closeted” or “in denial” actually does a dis-service to those of us (within the LGBT community) who really are closeted from fear or for whatever reason.

        “but they will, as far as I know, have to acknowledge the validity of out of state marriages if there’s a court ruling or anything involving federal benefits. ”

        That’s it exactly: They’ll have to deal with FEDERAL stuff. DOMA’s repeal (whenever it ultimately happens) will have no effect on the states themselves, except as inasmuch as it affects federal things within the states (which is a bare minimum). For example, Kansas won’t have to acknowledge the validity of same-sex marriages enacted in, say, New York at all. They WILL have to accept any/all (minimal) federal repercussions within Kansas. But that’ll really be the federal government apparatus in Kansas doing that, not the state government.

        • … painting the entire organization (or any entire organization) as “closeted” or “in denial” actually does a dis-service to those of us (within the LGBT community) who really are closeted from fear or for whatever reason.

          Yep, I see what you’re saying. To whatever extent I remember, I’ll avoid doing this in the future, since it’s not as if I can speak from any kind of personal experience on the topic.

  2. MichaelB says:

    “The mind of a bigot is like the pupil of the eye. The more light you shine
    on it, the more it will contract.”

    Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.

  3. Creativerealms says:

    I love Equality House, I’m surprised it took someone that long to do something like that. It really shows that the WBC are all bark and no bite.

    • They’re crazy, but they’re not stupid. If they lived by the letter of the law they hold so dear, they’d be stoning homosexuals and adulterers do death without regard for secular, “worldly” law or the punishment it would give for it.

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