Small Town Values

During every election, one of the ways Republicans try to distinguish themselves from their big-city, liberal elite opponents on the other side of the aisle is to make constant references to “small town values” that can be found in “real America”.  I never really understood those phrases, since it obviously implied that essentially every major population center in the country somehow lacks the community, morality, and humanity that we see in places off the beaten path.  You know, the places that remind you of home.

Like Maryville, Missouri.  Oh, to live in a small town where we can see the values of “True America” being demonstrated through the actions of some of their star high school football players drugging and raping young girls, leaving the victims out in front of their house in 30-degree weather, and passing the video they made of the incident around at school.

Daisy Coleman

In a town where everyone knows your name, it’s only natural for the victim to be blamed for her own rape, being called a “slut” or a “skank” in her own school, her brother is bullied, their mother is fired from her job, their house is burned to the ground, and their case dismissed because the suspect’s father has political connections.

Sadly, that’s the very thing I think of these days when I hear the phrase “small town values”.  I know full well it’s not universal, nor does this sort of thing happen all the time … but it happens often enough that I can’t help but build the association.  “Small towns” may vary, but the ones I know are places where “fags”, “dykes”, and “trannies” (forgive the terms) don’t exist, everyone’s Christian, and the star football players are put on pedestals so high that the entire community will rally behind them regardless of their crimes.

Daisy Coleman recently broke her silence to talk about the events of that night.  It’s depressing as hell, but I recommend reading it.

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